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Veterinarian Technician April 2012 (Vol 33, No 4)

Tech Tips

    Recycle Those Cardboard Rolls!

    Cardboard Rolls

    In the spirit of recycling, I use the inner cardboard rolls from 2-inch bandaging to separate our red rubber French feeding tubes and label them according to size. This allows for quick visual recognition—no more desperate searching through a mound of packages that look identical! This system also can be used to organize catheters.
    Alaine Knapton
    Companions Animal Hospital
    Boise, Idaho

    Drug Dosage Charts for Surgical Patients

    To save time and reduce the chance for error when preparing injections for surgical patients, I have made dosage charts for drugs we use routinely (e.g., pre- and postoperative, induction, pain, and antimicrobial drugs). I create the pages on the computer, put each in a page protector, and secure the pages with a dog-tag holder so the charts stay together and are easy to flip through. I have one “book” for dogs and one for cats.
    Joan Vanselow, CVT
    Appleton, Wisconsin

    Keep Patients Warm and Dry During Dental Cleanings

    When performing dental cleanings on small, fluffy dogs, we make a stocking body wrap for them, so the head, ears, and body are covered. This keeps excess hair out of the way of the spray, helping to keep the patient clean and dry. The stocking also helps maintain body temperature during the procedure.
    Ashley Westin, CVT
    Field Trainer—Oregon and SW Washington

    NEXT: Testing the Endocrine System for Adrenal Disorders and Diabetes Mellitus: It Is All About Signaling Hormones!

    didyouknow

    Did you know... Although oronasal fistulas are most common in dogs, cats can develop fistulas as a result of periodontal disease or tooth resorption. Read More

    These Care Guides are written to help your clients understand common conditions. They are formatted to print and give to your clients for their information.

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