Welcome to the all-new Vetlearn

  • What’s new on Vetlearn?
  • The latest issues of Compendium and
    Veterinary Technician
  • New CE articles for veterinarians and technicians
  • Expert advice on practice management
  • Care guides on more than 400 subjects
    to give to your clients
  • And more!

To access Vetlearn, you must first sign in or register.

registernow

Become a Member

Reference Desk April 2012

Research Studies Vaccinations to Protect Newborn Foals

    MANHATTAN, Kansas, April 4, 2012—A Kansas State University veterinary medicine student is investigating ways to improve horse vaccinations and defend them against pathogen challenges at an early age.

    Research from Allison Jordan Bryan, a graduate student in biomedical sciences and a second-year veterinary medicine student, may help protect foals as young as 3 months of age from pathogens such as West Nile virus, tetanus, equine influenza virus, Equine Herpes Virus-1, Eastern equine encephalomyelitis, and Western equine encephalomyelitis.

    "It is important, especially in the equine world, to vaccinate the foals as soon as possible so they will be protected against environmental pathogens they may come into contact with, even at an early age," Bryan said.

    Bryan recently received a second place award at the K-State Research Forum for her oral research presentation titled "Characterization of immune activation in healthy foals when vaccination is initiated at 3 months of age."

    Foals acquire maternal antibodies and immune cells that help protect them from environmental pathogens before they can fully develop their own immune systems, Bryan said. Newborn foals acquire these maternal antibodies and cells through ingestion and absorption of colostrum.

    Foals are usually vaccinated at 6 months of age, which gives time for maternal antibodies to decline so they do not interfere with any vaccines. But Bryan is looking at the possibility of vaccinating foals at 3 months of age—the earlier age is better because it gives foals more protection against pathogens earlier in life.

    "We're trying to determine whether those maternal antibodies are still in high enough concentration at 3 months to interfere with vaccines and block the active immune response or to see if these antibodies have waned enough to allow a robust immune response," Bryan said.

    Bryan is still collecting and analyzing data. Preliminary data has indicated an immune response in 3-month-old foals, making it possible to vaccinate foals at a younger age and increase protection.

    Although Bryan has always been interested in the immune system, she got involved with equine research after spending a summer in the university's Veterinary Research Scholars Program, which is funded by the National Institutes of Health and Merial, a worldwide animal health company.

    Bryan is now participating in the NIH-funded Basic Research Immersion Training Experience, or BRITE, program. Her faculty advisers are Elizabeth Davis, associate professor of clinical sciences, and Melinda Wilkerson, professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology.

    Source: Kansas State University

    didyouknow

    Did you know... For years, biologists have been amazed by the power of gecko feet, which let these 5-ounce lizards produce an adhesive force roughly equivalent to carrying nine pounds up a wall without slipping.Read More

    These Care Guides are written to help your clients understand common conditions. They are formatted to print and give to your clients for their information.

    Stay on top of all our latest content — sign up for the Vetlearn newsletters.
    • More
    Subscribe