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Reference Desk April 2011

Flea Control: Real Homes, Real Problems, Real Answers, Real Lessons

by Michael W. Dryden, DVM, MS, PhD, Doug Carithers, DVM, EVP, Michael J. Murray, DVM, MS, DACVIM

    Case Studies from Tampa, Florida, Summer 2009

    Flea control has always been difficult, and despite the advent of modern flea control products with excellent month-long activity against fleas and/or their eggs, for some pet owners, it is still problematic. Consequently, veterinary practices continue to get cases in which it appears that the flea control product they sold failed to work. 

    The complexity of flea biology, the effects of hosts and environment, and the limitations of clinic resources often make it impossible for clinicians to get to the root of flea control problems. This series of five cases illustrates real examples of challenging flea control situations in which owners continued to see fleas on treated pets. By understanding the results of these investigations and the factors that influence how flea infestations are established and sustained, you will learn how complicated flea problems can be and why simply blaming product performance is not a solution. 

    Click the links below to go to the separate cases.

    Case #1: Fleas in a Flash! (April 2011)
    Case #2: Where Are All These Fleas Coming From? (May 2011)
    Case #3: Hitchhiker Fleas and the Indoor-Only Cats (June 2011)
    Case #4: The "Deep Dive" (July 2011)
    Case #5: The What? (August 2011)

    These cases originally appeared in Dryden MW, Carithers D, Murray MJ. Flea control: real homes, real problems, real answers, real lessons. Compend Contin Educ Pract Vet 2011;33(1 suppl):1-16.


     


    This information in these cases has been peer reviewed. It does not necessarily reflect the opinions of, nor constitute or imply endorsement or recommendation by, the Publisher or Editorial Board. The Publisher is not responsible for any data, opinions, or statements provided herein.

    © 2011 Merial Limited, Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. Sponsored by Merial.

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