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Reference Desk April 2011

One Medicine: Animals Helping Humans

    2011 ACVIM Forum to highlight advances in veterinary medicine that help scientists cure and prevent human diseases

    DENVER, Colo., April 28, 2011–The key to curing and preventing human diseases such as asthma, diabetes, and neuromuscular disorders may lie in the paws of man's best friend as veterinarians and biomedical scientists from across the globe gather at the 2011 ACVIM Forum in Denver, Colo., June 15 - 18, to present the latest veterinary medical advances helping both animals and humans live longer, healthier lives.

    One Medicine, a term which acknowledges the fundamental similarities between living species as it relates to the practice of medicine, is a common theme of the 2011 conference.

    “It's a concise medical way of saying 'animals and people are more similar than different',” said Jeffrey Toll, VMD, DACVIM (Small Animal Internal Medicine), past-Chairperson of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine's (ACVIM) Education and Research Committee. “Not only does our work benefit animals, but spontaneous diseases in companion and other animals, such as horses, are being increasingly recognized as more accurate models for human diseases when compared to laboratory animals such as mice. As the veterinary experts on cancer, infections, and other animal diseases, collaborations between ACVIM Diplomates and the human biomedical research community were inevitable.”

    On June 18, the 2011 ACVIM Forum will offer four full hours of continuing education on the topic of One Medicine, including:
    More Than a Friend: How Clinical Studies in Pet Dogs Advance Human Medicine
    Steven W. Dow, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Small Animal Internal Medicine)

    Feline & Human Asthma: Bi-directional Comparative Medicine
    Carol R. Reinero, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Small Animal Internal Medicine)

    Comparative Genetics of Animal NeuromuscularDisease
    James R. Mickelson, DVM, PhD
     
    Pharmacogenetics: Understanding Individual Drug Responses
    Lauren A. Trepanier DVM, PhD, DACVCP,  DACVIM (Small Animal Internal Medicine)
     
    The ACVIM is the national certifying organization for veterinary specialists in Cardiology, Large Animal Internal Medicine, Neurology, Oncology, and Small Animal Internal Medicine. The ACVIM hosts an annual continuing education meeting (ACVIM Forum) where cutting-edge information, technology, and research abstracts are showcased for the veterinary community. For more information please visit www.ACVIMForum.org.

    The mission of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) is to enhance animal and human health by advancing veterinary internal medicine through training, education, and discovery.

    Source: ACVIM

    didyouknow

    Did you know... 4.4% of veterinarians younger than 30 work with food animals or a mix of food and companion animals, while 44% of those who do are 50 and older.

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