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Reference Desk December 2012

Ondansetron (Zofran): Product Removal due to Potential For Serious Cardiac Risks

    ISSUE: FDA is notifying health care professionals that the 32 mg, single intravenous (IV) dose of the anti-nausea drug Zofran (ondansetron hydrochloride) will no longer be marketed because of the potential for serious cardiac risks.

    BACKGROUND: The 32 mg, single IV dose of Zofran had been used to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. A previous Drug Safety Communication (DSC), issued on June 29, 2012, communicated that the 32 mg, single IV dose should be avoided due to the risk of a specific type of irregular heart rhythm called QT interval prolongation, which can lead to Torsades de Pointes, an abnormal, potentially fatal heart rhythm.  These drugs are sold pre-mixed in solutions of either dextrose or sodium chloride in plastic containers.

    FDA anticipates these products will be removed from the market through early 2013.  FDA does not anticipate that removal of the 32 mg intravenous dose of ondansetron currently sold as pre-mixed injections will contribute to a drug shortage of IV ondansetron, as the 32 mg dose makes up a very small percentage of the current market

    RECOMMENDATION: FDA continues to recommend the intravenous regimen of 0.15 mg/kg administered every 4 hours for three doses to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Oral dosing of Ondansetron remains effective for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. At this time, there is not enough information available for FDA to recommend an alternative single IV dose regimen.

    Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

    • Complete and submit the report Online: www.fda.gov/MedWatch/report.htm
    • Download form or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

    Read the complete MedWatch Safety Alert, including a link to the Safety Communication at:

    http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm330772.htm

    Source: FDA

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