Welcome to the all-new Vetlearn

  • Vetlearn is getting a new home. Starting this fall,
    Vetlearn becomes part of the NAVC VetFolio family.

    You'll have access to the entire Compendium and
    Veterinary Technician archives and get to explore
    even more ways to learn and earn CE by becoming
    a VetFolio subscriber. Subscriber benefits:
  • Over 500 hours of interactive CE Videos
  • An engaging new Community for tough cases
    and networking
  • Three years of NAVC Conference Proceedings
  • All-new articles (CE and other topics) for the entire
    healthcare team

To access Vetlearn, you must first sign in or register.

registernow

  • Registration for new subscribers will open in September 2014!
  • Watch for additional exciting news coming soon!
Become a Member

Reference Desk February 2012

Equine Herpesvirus Study Seeks to Unravel How Virus Unlocks Immune System "Gate"

    FORT COLLINS, Colorado—Researchers in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Colorado State University (CSU) are studying how equine herpesvirus type 1 may compromise the immune system immediately upon entering the “gate” of a horse’s respiratory system – the airway and throat – allowing it to spread through the body and potentially cause neurologic damage, abortion, and possibly death.

    The study specifically concentrates on the lining of the respiratory systems, called the epithelium, which keeps the airway moist and is a barrier to pathogens. The epithelial cells also serve a critical function in shaping the immunologic response, including secreting chemicals to attack pathogens and determining and initiating the cascade of immune responses in the rest of the body.

    “We believe that the herpesvirus finds a way to ‘hide’ from the immune response, and we also know that if an immune system doesn’t trigger a good response at the first sign of infection, viruses like this one take off,” said Dr. Gabrielle Landolt, a CSU veterinarian and a co-lead researcher on the project. "That combination of events may take place in the horse’s respiratory system, and if we can crack the equine herpesvirus’ secret to getting through that gateway and compromising the immune system at that point of entry, we may be better able to find treatments and preventive measures to stop outbreaks of the virus.”

    Equine herpesvirus-1 is spread through nose-to-nose contact and through close contact with contaminated equipment, clothing, and water and feed. The pathogen also may spread for a limited distance through the air. There are several types of equine herpesvirus, and there are also herpes strains that impact virtually every species. However, the virus does not jump from species to species.

    “The outcome of this research also will help scientists understand how herpes viruses in all species may impact immune systems,” said Dr. Gisela Hussey, also a veterinarian at CSU, who is leading the project. “This study is innovative because it is the first study to focus on defining the immune responses at the respiratory epithelium and how the virus controls the immune system.”

    The researchers are conducting the study on actual equine epithelium cells from deceased horses whose owners have volunteered the tissue for the research. The use of these cells in a model that mimics the actual response in a living horse also is novel in this research area.

    Source: Colorado State University

    didyouknow

    Did you know... In feline upper respiratory disease, combining removal by traction with a course of glucocorticoids may decrease recurrence of nasal polyps.Read More

    These Care Guides are written to help your clients understand common conditions. They are formatted to print and give to your clients for their information.

    Stay on top of all our latest content — sign up for the Vetlearn newsletters.
    • More
    Subscribe