Welcome to the all-new Vetlearn

  • Vetlearn is getting a new home. Starting this fall,
    Vetlearn becomes part of the NAVC VetFolio family.

    You'll have access to the entire Compendium and
    Veterinary Technician archives and get to explore
    even more ways to learn and earn CE by becoming
    a VetFolio subscriber. Subscriber benefits:
  • Over 500 hours of interactive CE Videos
  • An engaging new Community for tough cases
    and networking
  • Three years of NAVC Conference Proceedings
  • All-new articles (CE and other topics) for the entire
    healthcare team

To access Vetlearn, you must first sign in or register.

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  • Registration for new subscribers will open in September 2014!
  • Watch for additional exciting news coming soon!
Become a Member

Care Guide

About Care Guides[x] These care guides are written to help your clients understand common conditions, tests, and procedures, as well as to provide basic information about pet care. They are based on the most up-to-date, documented information, recommendations, and guidelines available in the United States at the time of writing. Pharmaceutical product licensing, availability, and usage recommendations are based on US product information. Use the Download Handout button to generate a PDF for printing or e-mailing to your clients.

Exercising Your Cat

    • Regular exercise is important to your cat’s health because it burns calories, reduces appetite, maintains muscle tone, and increases metabolism (the rate at which calories are burned).
    • You can help your cat become more active and stay fit by scheduling regular playtimes.
    • Consult your veterinarian before beginning an exercise program for your cat.

    Cats are notorious for preferring sleep to exercise. However, regular exercise is important to your cat’s health because it burns calories, reduces appetite, maintains muscle tone, and increases metabolism (the rate at which calories are burned). Here are some ideas to get your cat moving:

    • Leave out tissue paper and empty cardboard boxes and paper bags to inspire play
    • Provide fresh catnip
    • Encourage your cat to chase toys, sticks with attached feathers, balls, or flashlight pointers (never point these at an animal’s or person’s eyes)
    • Provide a cat tree to inspire climbing
    • Provide scratching posts or pads
    • Encourage play with other pets (set up play dates with the pets of friends or relatives; consider adopting another pet)
    • Train your cat to do tricks for low-calorie or small treats (e.g., train your cat to run to you from across the house or climb a cat “tree” when you shake the treat container; reward your cat with just one treat)
    • Provide specially designed activity toys that require your cat to do some work to remove a treat

    You can help your cat become more active and stay fit by scheduling regular playtimes. Consult your veterinarian before beginning an exercise program for your cat.

    Note:  Choose cat toys carefully. Cats may try to eat string or small parts of toys, which can be dangerous to their health. Do not leave toys out for cats to play with unattended.